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Tuesday 12 June 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Hayato Motohashi ( Yukawa Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kyoto University ) Constructing degenerate higher-order theories
Abstract: Scalar-tensor theories serve models for inflation and dark energy. Many efforts have been made recently for constructing the most general scalar-tensor theories with higher-order derivatives in their Lagrangian. Since higher-derivative theories are typically associated with Ostrogradsky ghost which causes unbounded Hamiltonian, it is important to clarify how to evade it. In this talk, I will explain construction of healthy degenerate theories with higher-order derivatives which circumvent Ostrogradsky ghost. The method also allows us to construct ghost-free theories with derivatives higher than second order in Lagrangian.

Tuesday 12 June 2018, 17:15 at DPT-PHYS-ENS, Jean Jaures (29 rue d'Ulm) SEM-PHYS-ENS (Colloquium du Département de Physique de l'ENS) physics.plasm-ph
Amitava Bhattacharjee ( Princeton University ) Fast magnetic reconnection in space and astrophysical plasmas
Abstract: TBA

Wednesday 13 June 2018, 14:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Cours de l'IHES )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Sergiu Klainerman ( Princeton University & IHES ) On the Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (1/4)
Abstract: The gravitational waves detected by LIGO were produced in the final faze of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so called Final State Conjecture of General Relativity according to which generic solutions of the Einstein vacuum equations can be described, asymptotically, by a finite number of Kerr solutions moving away from each other. Though the conjecture is so very easy to formulate and happens to be validated by both astrophysical observations as well as numerical experiments, it is far beyond our current mathematical understanding. In fact even the far simpler and fundamental question of the stability of one Kerr black hole remains wide open. In my lectures I will address the issue of stability as well as other aspects the mathematical theory of black holes such as rigidity of black holes and the problem of collapse. The rigidity conjecture asserts that all stationary solutions the Einstein vacuum equations must be Kerr black holes while the problem of collapse addresses the issue of how black holes form in the first place from regular initial conditions. Recent advances on all these problems were made possible by a remarkable combination of geometric and analytic techniques which I will try to outline in my lectures.

Wednesday 13 June 2018, 14:15 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-MAT (Séminaire de matrices, cordes et géométries aléatoires) hep-th
Achilleas Passias ( Uppsala ) (TBA)
Abstract: (TBA)

Thursday 14 June 2018, 11:30 at IPN, Bâtiment 100, Salle A015
( $ $ )
IPN-THEO (Séminaire du groupe de physique théorique de l'IPN Orsay) nucl-th
D.s. Delion ( Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering ) Alpha clustering in strong electromagnetic fields
Abstract: 1) The influence of a strong laser electromagnetic field on the alpha-decay rate is ingestigated by using the Hennenberger frame of reference [1] within adiabadic and static limits. The penetrability of the Coulomb barrier becomes anisotropic for intensities corresponding to $D\sim1$, where $D$ is an adimensional parameter proportional to the square root of the intensity. As a consequence, we predict that two counters placed at zero and 90 degrees will indicate different numbers. 2) Alpha clusters are born in nuclei at low densities, the wave function being a Gaussian peaked on the nuclear surface and therefore corresponding to a local pocket-like potential. The alpha-particle formation probability reaches the largest value in the ”alpha-decay island” above $^{100}$Sn for N$\sim$Z nuclei [2] and therefore the clusters can be easier detected. We show that the shape of the alpha-cluster can be determined by exciting it to the first resonant state inside the pocket-like potential, by using a quasi-monochromatic gamma-beam produced at the ELI-NP facility. The position and width of this ”alpha-like pygmy” resonant state [3] can be predicted by using the alpha-decay systematics to ground and excited states [4]. \\ [1] D.S. Delion and S. Ghinescu, Geiger-Nuttall law for nuclei in strong electromagnetic fields, Phys. Rev. Lett. 119, 202501 (2017).\newline [2] V.V. Baran and D.S. Delion, Proton-neutron versus alpha-like correlations above $^{100}$Sn, Phys. Rev. C 94, 034319 (2016).\newline [3] V.V. Baran and D.S. Delion, Alpha-like resonances in nuclei, J. Phys. G 45, 035106 (2018).\newline [4] D.S. Delion, Universal decay rule for reduced widths, Phys. Rev. C 80, 024310 (2009).
Attachments:
  • 2018_06_14_D_Delion.pdf (305852 bytes) OPEN

Friday 15 June 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/198 )
COURS (Cours) astro-ph|hep-ph
Marco Cirelli ( LPTHE Paris ) Dark matter phenomenology (1/5)
Abstract: Dark matter constitutes about 26\% of the present matter-energy content of the Universe (84\% of the matter-only content) and is one of the fundamental ingredients that shape the evolution of galaxies and the Universe. Surprisingly enough, the nature of dark matter is still unknown, and unveiling this mystery stands out as one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and particle physics. \par The course will present a basic overview of the state of the art in dark matter physics, mostly focussing on the phenomenology rather than on the many models proposed by particle theorists to explain it. \\ \par Plan of the lectures: \\ 1) Introduction, proofs of existence, and basic properties. Possible alternatives to particle dark matter and their status. \\ 2) Mechanisms of production in the early Universe: thermal freeze-out (in particular), freeze-in, asymmetric dark matter... \\ 3) Direct detection via nuclear recoils. \\ 4) Indirect detection with cosmic rays: charged particles, gamma rays (prompt and secondary), neutrinos. \\ 5) Collider searches (and possible complementarity of the searches).
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Cirelli.pdf (4733534 bytes) OPEN

Friday 15 June 2018, 14:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Cours de l'IHES )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Sergiu Klainerman ( Princeton University & IHES ) On the Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (2/4)
Abstract: The gravitational waves detected by LIGO were produced in the final faze of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so called Final State Conjecture of General Relativity according to which generic solutions of the Einstein vacuum equations can be described, asymptotically, by a finite number of Kerr solutions moving away from each other. Though the conjecture is so very easy to formulate and happens to be validated by both astrophysical observations as well as numerical experiments, it is far beyond our current mathematical understanding. In fact even the far simpler and fundamental question of the stability of one Kerr black hole remains wide open. In my lectures I will address the issue of stability as well as other aspects the mathematical theory of black holes such as rigidity of black holes and the problem of collapse. The rigidity conjecture asserts that all stationary solutions the Einstein vacuum equations must be Kerr black holes while the problem of collapse addresses the issue of how black holes form in the first place from regular initial conditions. Recent advances on all these problems were made possible by a remarkable combination of geometric and analytic techniques which I will try to outline in my lectures.

Friday 15 June 2018, 16:30 at LPTENS, LPTENS library STR-LPT-ENS-HE (Séminaire commun LPTENS/LPTHE) hep-th
Stephen Shenker ( Stanford ) Black holes and randoim matrices
Abstract: TBA

Monday 18 June 2018, 11:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-PHM (Séminaire de physique mathématique) math-ph
Sylvain Lacroix ( ENS Lyon ) Affine Gaudin models and integrable field theories
Abstract: In this seminar, we will discuss affine Gaudin models, which are integrable systems associated with Kac-Moody algebras of affine type. \par First, we will review how these models can be classically interpreted as integrable field theories in two dimensions. Conversely, we shall see that integrable sigma-models, which are typical examples of such theories, are realisations of classical affine Gaudin models. \par In a second part, we will discuss results and conjectures about quantum affine Gaudin models, concerning the construction of higher degree quantum Hamiltonians and their diagonalisation through the Bethe ansatz. Finally, we will explore the possible relation of these results with the ODE/IM correspondence, using the language of affine opers.

Tuesday 19 June 2018, 11:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-GEN (Séminaire général du SPhT) physics
Gabriele Veneziano ( CERN et Collège de France ) (TBA)

Tuesday 19 June 2018, 11:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Yan Soibelman ( Kansas State University & IHES ) Cohomological Hall algebras, vertex algebras and instantons
Abstract: The notion of Cohomological Hall algebra (COHA) was introduced in our joint paper with Maxim Kontsevich 10 years ago. It can be thought of as a mathematical incarnation of the notion of BPS algebra envisioned by physicists Harvey and Moore in the 90's. Mathematically, COHA is an associative algebra structure on the cohomology of the moduli stack of objects of a 3-dimensional Calabi-Yau category with coefficients in a certain constructible sheaf. Interesting categories can be of geometric or algebraic origin (sheaves on Calabi-Yau 3-folds, quivers with potential, etc.). In the talk I plan to discuss actions of COHA on the cohomology of certain instanton moduli spaces (spiked instantons of Nekrasov). This gives a relationship of COHA with affine Yangians and more recent "vertex algebras at the corner" introduced by Gaiotto and Rapcak.

Tuesday 19 June 2018, 14:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Cours de l'IHES )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Sergiu Klainerman ( Princeton University & IHES ) On the Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (3/4)
Abstract: The gravitational waves detected by LIGO were produced in the final faze of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so called Final State Conjecture of General Relativity according to which generic solutions of the Einstein vacuum equations can be described, asymptotically, by a finite number of Kerr solutions moving away from each other. Though the conjecture is so very easy to formulate and happens to be validated by both astrophysical observations as well as numerical experiments, it is far beyond our current mathematical understanding. In fact even the far simpler and fundamental question of the stability of one Kerr black hole remains wide open. In my lectures I will address the issue of stability as well as other aspects the mathematical theory of black holes such as rigidity of black holes and the problem of collapse. The rigidity conjecture asserts that all stationary solutions the Einstein vacuum equations must be Kerr black holes while the problem of collapse addresses the issue of how black holes form in the first place from regular initial conditions. Recent advances on all these problems were made possible by a remarkable combination of geometric and analytic techniques which I will try to outline in my lectures.

Tuesday 19 June 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Albino Hernandez Galeana ( University of Mexico ) TBA

Friday 22 June 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/198 )
COURS (Cours) astro-ph|hep-ph
Marco Cirelli ( LPTHE Paris ) Dark matter phenomenology (2/5)
Abstract: Dark matter constitutes about 26\% of the present matter-energy content of the Universe (84\% of the matter-only content) and is one of the fundamental ingredients that shape the evolution of galaxies and the Universe. Surprisingly enough, the nature of dark matter is still unknown, and unveiling this mystery stands out as one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and particle physics. \par The course will present a basic overview of the state of the art in dark matter physics, mostly focussing on the phenomenology rather than on the many models proposed by particle theorists to explain it. \\ \par Plan of the lectures: \\ 1) Introduction, proofs of existence, and basic properties. Possible alternatives to particle dark matter and their status. \\ 2) Mechanisms of production in the early Universe: thermal freeze-out (in particular), freeze-in, asymmetric dark matter... \\ 3) Direct detection via nuclear recoils. \\ 4) Indirect detection with cosmic rays: charged particles, gamma rays (prompt and secondary), neutrinos. \\ 5) Collider searches (and possible complementarity of the searches).
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Cirelli.pdf (4733534 bytes) OPEN

Friday 22 June 2018, 14:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Cours de l'IHES )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Sergiu Klainerman ( Princeton University & IHES ) On the Mathematical Theory of Black Holes (4/4)
Abstract: The gravitational waves detected by LIGO were produced in the final faze of the inward spiraling of two black holes before they collided to produce a more massive black hole. The experiment is entirely consistent with the so called Final State Conjecture of General Relativity according to which generic solutions of the Einstein vacuum equations can be described, asymptotically, by a finite number of Kerr solutions moving away from each other. Though the conjecture is so very easy to formulate and happens to be validated by both astrophysical observations as well as numerical experiments, it is far beyond our current mathematical understanding. In fact even the far simpler and fundamental question of the stability of one Kerr black hole remains wide open. In my lectures I will address the issue of stability as well as other aspects the mathematical theory of black holes such as rigidity of black holes and the problem of collapse. The rigidity conjecture asserts that all stationary solutions the Einstein vacuum equations must be Kerr black holes while the problem of collapse addresses the issue of how black holes form in the first place from regular initial conditions. Recent advances on all these problems were made possible by a remarkable combination of geometric and analytic techniques which I will try to outline in my lectures.

Monday 25 June 2018, 10:45 at LPTMC, Jussieu, room 5-23, 5th floor, tower 13-12 SEM-LPTMC (Séminaire du Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée) cond-mat.mes-hall
Simon/boris Moulieras/mantisi ( Myndblue/Quatorze-IG ) TBA

Tuesday 26 June 2018, 11:30 at LPTENS, LPTENS library STR-LPT-ENS-HE (Séminaire commun LPTENS/LPTHE) hep-th
Julian Sonner ( Université de Genève ) TBA
Abstract: TBA

Tuesday 26 June 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Emilian Dudas ( CPHT - Ecole Polytechnique ) TBA

Tuesday 26 June 2018, 16:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-HEP (Séminaire de physique des particules et de cosmologie) hep-ph
Davide Racco ( Université de Genève ) Cosmological signatures of the SM Higgs instability: Primordial Black Holes and Gravitational Waves
Abstract: For the current central values of the Higgs boson and top quark masses, the standard model Higgs potential develops an instability at a scale of the order of $10^{11}\,$GeV. We show that cosmological signatures of such instability could be dark matter in the form of primordial black holes and the production of gravitational waves, sourced by Higgs fluctuations during inflation. The existence of dark matter might not require physics beyond the standard model, and this hypothesis may find its confirmation through the detection of gravitational waves.

Tuesday 26 June 2018, 17:15 at DPT-PHYS-ENS, Jean Jaures (29 rue d'Ulm) SEM-PHYS-ENS (Colloquium du Département de Physique de l'ENS) physics.flu-dyn
William Young ( UC San Diego ) Long range propagation of ocean swell
Abstract: TBA

Friday 29 June 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/198 )
COURS (Cours) astro-ph|hep-ph
Marco Cirelli ( LPTHE Paris ) Dark matter phenomenology (3/5)
Abstract: Dark matter constitutes about 26\% of the present matter-energy content of the Universe (84\% of the matter-only content) and is one of the fundamental ingredients that shape the evolution of galaxies and the Universe. Surprisingly enough, the nature of dark matter is still unknown, and unveiling this mystery stands out as one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and particle physics. \par The course will present a basic overview of the state of the art in dark matter physics, mostly focussing on the phenomenology rather than on the many models proposed by particle theorists to explain it. \\ \par Plan of the lectures: \\ 1) Introduction, proofs of existence, and basic properties. Possible alternatives to particle dark matter and their status. \\ 2) Mechanisms of production in the early Universe: thermal freeze-out (in particular), freeze-in, asymmetric dark matter... \\ 3) Direct detection via nuclear recoils. \\ 4) Indirect detection with cosmic rays: charged particles, gamma rays (prompt and secondary), neutrinos. \\ 5) Collider searches (and possible complementarity of the searches).
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Cirelli.pdf (4733534 bytes) OPEN

Monday 2 July 2018, 10:45 at LPTMC, Jussieu, room 5-23, 5th floor, tower 13-12 SEM-LPTMC (Séminaire du Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée) cond-mat.mes-hall
Anthony Lesage ( LPTMC ) Antony Lesage (LPTMC)
Abstract: TBA

Tuesday 3 July 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Léonie Canet ( Université de Grenoble ) Correlation functions in fully developed turbulence
Abstract: Turbulence is an ubiquitous phenomenon in natural and industrial fluid flows. Yet, it still lacks a satisfactory theoretical description. One of the main open issues is to calculate the statistical properties of the turbulent steady state, and in particular what is generically called intermittency effects, starting from the fundamental description of the fluid dynamics provided by Navier-Stokes equation. In this presentation, I will focus on isotropic and homogeneous turbulence in three-dimensional incompressible flows. In the first part, I will give an introduction on the basic phenomenology of turbulence, and show what are the typical manifestations of intermittency. In the second part, I will explain how one can derive exact asymptotic (i.e. at large wave- numbers) properties of the correlation functions in the turbulent state, using a field-theoretic approach, based on the Non-Perturbative Renormalisation Group, and compare them to numerical simulations and experiments.

Wednesday 4 July 2018, 14:15 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-MAT (Séminaire de matrices, cordes et géométries aléatoires) hep-th
Pablo Soler ( ITP Heidelberg ) (TBA)
Abstract: (TBA)

Friday 6 July 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/198 )
COURS (Cours) astro-ph|hep-ph
Marco Cirelli ( LPTHE Paris ) Dark matter phenomenology (4/5)
Abstract: Dark matter constitutes about 26\% of the present matter-energy content of the Universe (84\% of the matter-only content) and is one of the fundamental ingredients that shape the evolution of galaxies and the Universe. Surprisingly enough, the nature of dark matter is still unknown, and unveiling this mystery stands out as one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and particle physics. \par The course will present a basic overview of the state of the art in dark matter physics, mostly focussing on the phenomenology rather than on the many models proposed by particle theorists to explain it. \\ \par Plan of the lectures: \\ 1) Introduction, proofs of existence, and basic properties. Possible alternatives to particle dark matter and their status. \\ 2) Mechanisms of production in the early Universe: thermal freeze-out (in particular), freeze-in, asymmetric dark matter... \\ 3) Direct detection via nuclear recoils. \\ 4) Indirect detection with cosmic rays: charged particles, gamma rays (prompt and secondary), neutrinos. \\ 5) Collider searches (and possible complementarity of the searches).
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Cirelli.pdf (4733534 bytes) OPEN

Monday 9 July 2018, 10:45 at LPTMC, Jussieu, room 5-23, 5th floor, tower 13-12 SEM-LPTMC (Séminaire du Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée) cond-mat.mes-hall
Marylou Gabrié ( LPS-ENS ) Apprentissage automatique et physique statistique

Tuesday 10 July 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Stéphane Lavignac ( IPhT ) TBA

Friday 13 July 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/198 )
COURS (Cours) astro-ph|hep-ph
Marco Cirelli ( LPTHE Paris ) Dark matter phenomenology (5/5)
Abstract: Dark matter constitutes about 26\% of the present matter-energy content of the Universe (84\% of the matter-only content) and is one of the fundamental ingredients that shape the evolution of galaxies and the Universe. Surprisingly enough, the nature of dark matter is still unknown, and unveiling this mystery stands out as one of the most pressing issues in cosmology and particle physics. \par The course will present a basic overview of the state of the art in dark matter physics, mostly focussing on the phenomenology rather than on the many models proposed by particle theorists to explain it. \\ \par Plan of the lectures: \\ 1) Introduction, proofs of existence, and basic properties. Possible alternatives to particle dark matter and their status. \\ 2) Mechanisms of production in the early Universe: thermal freeze-out (in particular), freeze-in, asymmetric dark matter... \\ 3) Direct detection via nuclear recoils. \\ 4) Indirect detection with cosmic rays: charged particles, gamma rays (prompt and secondary), neutrinos. \\ 5) Collider searches (and possible complementarity of the searches).
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Cirelli.pdf (4733534 bytes) OPEN

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