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The SEMPARIS seminar webserver hosts annoucements of all seminars taking place in Paris area, in all topics of physics, mathematics and computer science. It allows registered users to receive a selection of announcements by email on a daily or weekly basis, and offers the possibility to archive PDF or Powerpoint files, making it available to the scientific community.   [ More information ]


Upcoming Seminars [Next 30 ]
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Monday 22 January 2018, 11:00 at LPTMC, tower 13-12 5th floor room 5-23 SEM-LPTMC (Séminaire du Laboratoire de Physique Théorique de la Matière Condensée) cond-mat.mes-hall
Christina Kurzthaler ( Universitaet Innsbruck ) Spatiotemporal dynamics of active agents
Abstract: Various challenges are faced when microorganisms or artificially synthesized self-propelled particles move autonomously in aqueous media at low Reynolds number. These active agents are intrinsically out of equilibrium and exhibit peculiar dynamical behavior due to the complex interplay of stochastic fluctuations and directed swimming motion. In particular, these particles display fascinating physics ranging from the run-and-tumble motion of bacteria to the noisy circular trajectories of biological or artificial microswimmers due to hydrodynamic couplings in the vicinity of interfaces or chiral body shapes. Here, we provide a theoretical analysis of the spatiotemporal dynamics of different types of active particles in terms of the experimentally accessible intermediate scattering function. Our analytical predictions characterize the spatiotemporal dynamics of catalytic Janus particles, a paradigmatic class of synthetic active agents, from the smallest length scales where translational Brownian motion dominates, up to the largest ones, which probe the randomization of the swimming direction due to rotational diffusion. We also show that our theoretical framework finds application in different areas such as polymer physics.

Monday 22 January 2018, 13:30 at LPA, L363-365 LPA (Séminaire du laboratoire Pierre Aigrain) cond-mat
Nicolas Didier ( Rigetti Computing, Berkeley ) Hybrid quantum/classical computing on a 19-qubit processor based on parametrically-activated entangling gates
Abstract: Superconducting devices are one of the most promising platforms for building quantum computers, but demonstrating fault-tolerance on any quantum computing implementation remains a challenge. In recent years new hybrid quantum/classical algorithms targeting near-term devices have been proposed, focusing on short-depth parameterized quantum circuits and using quantum computation as a subroutine embedded in a larger classical optimization loop, without the immediate need for fault-tolerance. Rigetti Computing has built a flexible computing platform targeting precisely such hybrid applications, relying on custom entangling gates based on parametrically-activated interactions. In this talk I will explain the physics behind these two-qubit gates, how it enables the implementation of two distinct classes of entangling operations, and describe many features that make this architecture attractive from a scalability perspective. Finally, I will present how this gate architecture was used to demonstrate a hybrid algorithm for an unsupervised machine learning task known as clustering on a 19-qubit processor.

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 11:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Antoine Gloria ( UPMC ) Théorie spectrale approchée et transport balistique asymptotique des ondes en milieu quasi-périodique
Abstract: Séminaire Laurent Schwartz -- EDP et applications

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 14:00 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Séminaire Laurent Schwartz -- EDP et applications )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Xavier Ros-Oton ( Univ. Zurich ) Regularity of Free Boundaries in Obstacle Problems for Integro-Differential Operators

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Matthew Lewandowski ( IPhT ) The EFT of Dark Energy and the EFT of Large-Scale Structure
Abstract: In the next few years, we are going to probe the low-redshift universe with unprecedented accuracy. Among the various fruits that this will bear, it will greatly improve our knowledge of the dynamics of dark energy. A particularly useful description of dark energy is through the Effective Field Theory of Dark Energy, which assumes that dark energy is the Goldstone boson of broken time translations. Such a formalism makes it easy to ensure that predicted signatures are consistent with well-established principles of physics. Since most of the information resides at high wavenumbers, it is important to be able to make predictions at the highest wavenumber that is possible. The Effective Field Theory of Large-Scale Structure (EFTofLSS) is a theoretical framework that has allowed us to make accurate predictions in the mildly non-linear regime. In this talk, I will discuss both the EFTofLSS and the EFTofDE, including the extension of the EFTofLSS to include the non- linear effects of Horndeski-type dark energy in the quasi-static limit.

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 15:30 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane
( Séminaire Laurent Schwartz -- EDP et applications )
MATH-IHES (TBA) hep-th
Michal Kowalczyk ( Univ. del Chile ) End-to-End Construction of the Maximal Solution of the Liouville Equation

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 16:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-HEP (Séminaire de physique des particules et de cosmologie) hep-ph
Brando Bellazzini ( IPhT ) Beyond Amplitudes' Positivity and the Space of (In)consistent EFTs
Abstract: In this talk I will discuss which Effective Field Theories (EFTs) may arise from underlying microscopic theories that have a unitarity, analytic, and crossing-symmetric S-matrix. I will show various applications in particle phenomenology as well as in cosmology, including recent theoretical constraints on Galileons and Lorentz-invariant massive gravity theories.

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 16:30 at UPMC, Amphithéâtre G. Charpak - Rez-de-chaussée - Patio 22-33 CPMC (Colloquium Pierre et Marie Curie) physics.ao-ph
Valérie Masson-Delmotte ( CEA ) Changement climatique, sciences du climat et expertise collective
Abstract: Le Groupe intergouvernemental d'experts sur l'évolution du climat (GIEC) a pour mandat de coordonner la rédaction de rapports sur l'état des connaissances scientifiques vis-à-vis du changement climatique, ses impacts, et les options de réponse tant pour l'adaptation que pour l'atténuation. Pour la préparation des rapports, le GIEC fait appel au travail volontaire de centaines d'auteurs et de milliers de relecteurs. C'est un organisme scientifique unique, qui joue un rôle clé pour une évaluation critique de l'état des connaissances et de leurs limites, pour le partage des connaissances, et pour le renforcement d'approches interdisciplinaires des multiples dimensions du changement climatique. J'expliquerai comment s'articule l'échange entre les gouvernements et la communauté scientifique pour la préparation de ces rapports. J'expliquerai les différentes étapes de préparation et de sélection des auteurs des rapports et mettrai l'accent sur la manière de participer au processus de relecture. J'illustrerai l'évolution des connaissances vis-à-vis des causes des changements observés, et dans la compréhension des risques associés à la montée du niveau des mers, et comment l'identification de verrous scientifiques peut stimuler de nouvelles voies de recherche. En mars 2018, le GIEC fêtera ses 30 ans, à Paris. Ce sera l'occasion de structurer une réflexion sur les relations entre science et société, vis-à-vis du changement climatique, et s'interroger sur le futur des rapports d'évaluation du GIEC : quels besoins ? quelles méthodes ? quelles approches pour communiquer les conclusions ?
Attachments:
  • AfficheValerieMASSON.pdf (7769060 bytes) OPEN

Tuesday 23 January 2018, 17:15 at DPT-PHYS-ENS, room Jean Jaurès (29 rue d'Ulm) SEM-PHYS-ENS (Colloquium du Département de Physique de l'ENS) cond-mat.soft
Yoel Forterre ( Aix-Marseille University ) Stories of grains in fluids: from impact in dense suspensions to micro-avalanches in plant cells
Abstract: Over the past twenty years, great progress has been made in our understanding of how granular matter flows, a topic of both basic and practical interest. A distinctive feature of granular flows is that they display a flow threshold and a maximal packing fraction, beyond which no permanent flow is possible (jamming transition). In this seminar, I will illustrate how physical phenomena at the particle level (fluid drag, colloidal forces, particle agitation) can profoundly affect the flow behavior of a mixture of grains and fluids close to the jamming transition. First, I will show that the short-time response of a dense suspension under impact is entirely controlled by the coupling between transient effects (Reynolds dilatancy) and the fluid pressure. I will then discuss how the addition of short-range repulsive forces between grains can conspire with friction to yield the dramatic shear-thickening behavior displayed by some suspensions like cornstarch. Finally, I will show how the sensor of gravity of plants relies on intracellular micro-avalanches flowing in an active liquid.

Wednesday 24 January 2018, 14:15 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-MAT (Séminaire de matrices, cordes et géométries aléatoires) hep-th
Juan Diaz Dorronsoro ( ITF - KU Leuven ) Towards an explicit model of large field inflation
Abstract: Antibranes are the usual suspects of de Sitter model building in string theory. They have been extensively used in flux compactifications to uplift anti de Stitter vacua to metastable de Sitter minima. In this talk I will start by briefly reviewing some recent results on the (non-)existence of antibrane solutions as the ones used in model building. Afterwards I will present a model for inflation based on a series of antibrane annihilation processes, which provides a concrete string theory realization of the unwinding inflation mechanism. I will argue that the model succeeds in providing a large field excursion for the inflaton while satisfying the constraints required to maintain a consistent effective field theory.

Thursday 25 January 2018, 10:00 at LPTHE, IMPMC, salle 401, tour 22-23, 4eme étage
( Beware, unusual location ! )
RENC-THEO (Rencontres Théoriciennes) hep-th
Amos Yarom ( Technion ) The large D limit of holographic turbulence
Abstract: I will discuss a recent attempt at gaining a handle over turbulent behaviour of fluids by appealing to the gauge gravity duality in the limit where the number of dimensions becomes very large. We will see that in this limit the gauge gravity duality simplifies and that the dynamics of the system are encoded in the large d limit of the hydrodynamic equations of motion.

Thursday 25 January 2018, 11:00 at IPN, Salle A201 IPN-X (Séminaire commun de physique théorique des particules IPN-CPHT-X) hep-lat
Nicolas Garron ( Univ. of Liverpool ) The nucleon axial charge from Lattice QCD
Abstract: The axial coupling of the nucleon, gA, is a simple but fundamental quantity in particle physics. While gA is very well-measured experimentally, its theoretical prediction has been a long-standing puzzle: the lattice determinations being systematically below the experimental value. If we want to understand nuclear physics from first principle, it is crucial to solve this puzzle. I will present our recent computation performed with CalLat (California Lattice) based on a Feynman-Hellmann approach. Our result is in perfect agreement with the experimental value with an uncertainty of less than 2%. I will discuss the various sources of systematic errors and I will give the several ingredients that allow our determination to be significantly more precise than the previous lattice computations.

Thursday 25 January 2018, 11:45 at LPTHE, IMPMC, salle 401, tour 22-23, 4eme étage
( Beware, unusual location ! )
RENC-THEO (Rencontres Théoriciennes) hep-th
Piotr Tourkine ( CERN ) New duality symmetric theories from twisted strings
Abstract: Twistor strings have undergone a renewal of interest since the discovery of the Cachazo-He- Yuan formalism for scattering amplitude in field theory in 2013. These formulae deeply challenge the way we think about scattering amplitudes in quantum field theory and are neatly explained by the so-called ambitwistor string, a cousin of the old twistor string. The existence of these remarkable formalisms, which I shall present during the talk, cried for a connection to good old string theory. The answer to this question is now understood: it relies on counter-intuitive limits and crucially, the existence of a different quantization for string theory, which we called “twisted strings”. The first part of the talk will be concerned on making that connection to string theory clear. In the second part, I’ll report on recent results obtained with Eduardo Casali on the winding modes of these twisted strings. They give rise to new exotic target space theories, naively non unitary, but exhibiting features half way between string and field theory. In particular, they are T-duality symmetric.

Friday 26 January 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/195 )
COURS (Cours) math.AG
Bertrand Eynard ( IPhT ) Riemann surfaces (3/5)
Abstract: Algebraic equations are widespread in mathematics and physics, and the geometry of their spaces of solutions can be complicated. In the case of an equation of two complex variables, the space of solutions is a Riemann surface. \par We will provide basic tools (going back to Riemann) for studying algebraic equations and describing the geometry of compact Riemann surfaces. \par We will consider a Riemann surface defined from the solution locus of a polynomial equation $P(x,y)=0$ in $\mathbb{C} \times \mathbb{C}$. We will study its topology and geometry, and learn how to integrate differential forms along closed contours. Then we will describe the moduli space of Riemann surfaces with a given topology: its dimension, topology, etc. \par We will introduce some of the many tools that have been invented since the time of Riemann for studying these objects. We will partly follow the Mumford Tata lectures, the Fay lectures, and the Farkas-Kra book. \\ \\ The plan is: \\ - Compact Riemann surfaces, charts, atlas, toplogy. Meromorphic functions and one-forms. Theorems on poles and residues. Newton's polygon. \\ - Integrals, periods, Abel map, Jacobian, divisors. Theta functions, prime form, fundamental form. Basis of cycles, homology and cohomology. \\ - Moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces. Deligne-Mumford compactification, Chern classes, tautological ring. Kontsevich integral and KdV hierarchy. \\ - If times permits: fiber bundles, Hitchin systems, link to integrable systems.
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Eynard_0.pdf (4424243 bytes) OPEN

Friday 26 January 2018, 11:00 at LPTHE, Bibliothèque SEM-LPTHE (Séminaire du LPTHE) cond-mat.stat-mech
André Neveu ( Laboratoire Charles Coulomb Montpellier ) A Bäcklund transformation for elliptic four-point conformal blocks
Abstract: In Liouville theory, we derive a partial differential equation for five-point correlation functions with one degenerate field $V_{-b/2}$. From it, one obtains explicit finite-dimensional integral representations in terms of elliptic theta-functions for a class of four-point conformal blocks for arbitrary intermediate dimension and generic value of the central charge. The conformal bootstrap can then be investigated analytically. Introducing a Bäcklund transformation on the solutions of the partial differential equation, one can reach a large extended set of external dimensions of these conformal blocks.

Monday 29 January 2018, 10:30 at IMPMC, Jussieu 23-22, 4e, salle 401 SEM-EXCEP (Séminaire exceptionel) physics
Sophie Lhenry ( Pôle égalité femmes-hommes, Université Paris-Diderot ) Les carrières en physique à l’épreuve du genre
Abstract: À partir de deux enquêtes sociologiques menées auprès de chercheur.e.s et d’enseignant.e.s-chercheur.e.s en STEM entre 2006 et 2016, nous aborderons les normes de réussite académique et leur aspect genré. Nous nous intéresserons particulièrement à l’impact de ces normes sur l’équilibre vie professionnelle/vie privée et sur les carrières des physiciens et physiciennes. Nous présenterons enfin les actions visant à favoriser les carrières des chercheur.e.s, expérimentées dans le cadre du projet européen TRIGGER et plus spécifiquement à l’université Paris Diderot à travers le Pôle Égalité Femmes-Hommes (PEFH).

Tuesday 30 January 2018, 13:30 at LPTM, Maison internationale de la recherche, Neuville-sur-Oise. SEM-EXCEP (Séminaire exceptionel) cond-mat.dis-nn
Roberto Livi ( Universita di Firenze, Italy ) Complex dynamics in neuromorphic circuits
Abstract: Neural population made of inhibitory and excitatory units exhibit complex collective dynamics when they are organized according to suitable circuits. In particular, amplification and synchronization mechanisms may emerge as purely noise driven effects: These results disclose new perspectives in the design of neuromorphic circuits performing specific tasks, like, signal categorization and detection.

Tuesday 30 January 2018, 14:00 at APC, 483 A - Malevitch APC-TH (Seminar of the theory group of APC) hep-th
Razvan Gurau ( CPHT - Ecole Polytechnique ) Invitation to Random Tensors
Abstract: Random matrices are ubiquitous in modern theoretical physics and provide insights on a wealth of phenomena, from the spectra of heavy nuclei to the theory of strong interactions or random two dimensional surfaces. The backbone of all the analytical results in matrix models is their 1/N expansion (where N is the size of the matrix). Despite early attempts in the '90, the generalization of this 1/N expansion to higher dimensional random tensor models has proven very challenging. This changed with the discovery of the 1/N expansion (originally for colored and subsequently for arbitrary invariant) tensor models in 2010. I this talk I will present a short introduction to the modern theory of random tensors and its connections to conformal field theory and random higher dimensional random geometry.

Tuesday 30 January 2018, 14:30 at IHES, Amphithéâtre Léon Motchane PT-IHES (Séminaire de physique théorique de l'IHES) hep-th
Pavel Saponov ( HSE & IHES ) Cayley-Hamilton Identity and Drinfeld-Sokolov Reduction in Quantum Algebras
Abstract: Different forms of the matrix Cayley-Hamilton identity in some quantum algebras will be presented. In particular, I plan consider the so-called braided Yangian -- some generalization of Drinfeld Yangian -- recently introduced in my joint work with D. Gurevich. A quantum counterpart of the Drinfeld-Sokolov reduction based on the Cayley-Hamilton identity will be discussed as well.

Tuesday 30 January 2018, 16:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-HEP (Séminaire de physique des particules et de cosmologie) hep-ph
Joan Elias Miro ( SISSA ) Towards a S-matrix bootstrap for unstable resonances
Abstract: The modern incarnation of the analytic S-matrix is a non-perturbative approach that consist in exploring the space of S-matrix elements consistent with unitarity, analyticity, crossing symmetry and some extra physical assumptions about the mass spectrum of particles. In this talk I will discuss my work in progress to extend the recent ideas of the S-matrix bootstrap to include unstable resonances. This extension is crucial in order to apply such program to realistic particle physics questions involving unstable bound states. The goal of the program I will discuss is to uncover the space of consistent S-matrices for Higgs-like bosons.

Thursday 1 February 2018, 11:30 at LPTENS, LPTENS Library STRINT (Strings, integrability and beyond) hep-th
Tba (ens/saclay Seminar) TBA

Thursday 1 February 2018, 14:00 at LPTM, 4.13 St Martin II SEM-LPTM-UCP (Seminaires du LPTM , Universite de Cergy Pontoise) cond-mat
Pierre Fromholz ( LPTM UCP Cergy Pontoise ) TBA
Abstract: TBA

Thursday 1 February 2018, 14:30 at LPTENS, LPTENS Library STRINT (Strings, integrability and beyond) hep-th
Tba (ens/saclay Seminar) TBA

Friday 2 February 2018, 10:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774
( https://courses.ipht.cnrs.fr/?q=fr/node/195 )
COURS (Cours) math.AG
Bertrand Eynard ( IPhT ) Riemann surfaces (4/5)
Abstract: Algebraic equations are widespread in mathematics and physics, and the geometry of their spaces of solutions can be complicated. In the case of an equation of two complex variables, the space of solutions is a Riemann surface. \par We will provide basic tools (going back to Riemann) for studying algebraic equations and describing the geometry of compact Riemann surfaces. \par We will consider a Riemann surface defined from the solution locus of a polynomial equation $P(x,y)=0$ in $\mathbb{C} \times \mathbb{C}$. We will study its topology and geometry, and learn how to integrate differential forms along closed contours. Then we will describe the moduli space of Riemann surfaces with a given topology: its dimension, topology, etc. \par We will introduce some of the many tools that have been invented since the time of Riemann for studying these objects. We will partly follow the Mumford Tata lectures, the Fay lectures, and the Farkas-Kra book. \\ \\ The plan is: \\ - Compact Riemann surfaces, charts, atlas, toplogy. Meromorphic functions and one-forms. Theorems on poles and residues. Newton's polygon. \\ - Integrals, periods, Abel map, Jacobian, divisors. Theta functions, prime form, fundamental form. Basis of cycles, homology and cohomology. \\ - Moduli spaces of Riemann surfaces. Deligne-Mumford compactification, Chern classes, tautological ring. Kontsevich integral and KdV hierarchy. \\ - If times permits: fiber bundles, Hitchin systems, link to integrable systems.
Attachments:
  • 2017-2018.pdf (4503344 bytes) OPEN
  • 2018_Eynard_0.pdf (4424243 bytes) OPEN

Friday 2 February 2018, 11:00 at LPTHE, Bibliothèque SEM-LPTHE (Séminaire du LPTHE) cond-mat.stat-mech
Lev Ioffe ( LPTHE ) Non-ergodicity in many body systems and disordered random graphs; application to the phase diagram of Josephson junction chain
Abstract: At very high disorder a generic closed quantum systems becomes completely localized. I argue that this (may body) localization is preempted by a wide regime of non-ergodic behavior that displays a number of unusual properties. A good system to study these effects are Josephson junction arrays in a somewhat unusual regime. The toy model of disordered many body systems that capture the physics of many body systems is provided by random regular graphs. I will sketch a simplified analytical theory of the non-ergodic phase in this models, compare the results with the direct numerical simulations and summarize the conclusions relevant for physical many body systems.

Monday 5 February 2018, 11:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-PHM (Séminaire de physique mathématique) math-ph
Sanjay Ramassamy ( ENS, Lyon ) Miquel dynamics on circle patterns
Abstract: Circle patterns are one of the ways to uniformize graphs on surfaces, by embedding them in such a way that every face admits a circumcircle. In this talk I will describe a discrete-time dynamical system on circle patterns with the combinatorics of the square grid, called Miquel dynamics. It is based on the classical Miquel's six circles theorem. I will present some properties of this dynamics which suggest its integrability. \\ \\ Partly joint work with Alexey Glutsyuk (CNRS, Ecole normale superieure de Lyon / Higher School of Economics).

Tuesday 6 February 2018, 11:30 at LPTENS, LPTENS library STR-LPT-ENS-HE (Séminaire commun LPTENS/LPTHE) hep-th
Blagoje Oblak ( ETH ) Berry Phases of Boundary Gravitons
Abstract: This talk is devoted to Berry phases that appear in unitary representations of asymptotic symmetry groups in general relativity. These phases arise when a coherent state is acted upon by symmetry transformations that trace a closed path in the group manifold, and they can be evaluated exactly even when the group is infinite-dimensional. We apply these ideas to the Virasoro and BMS groups; seeing their representations as particles dressed with boundary gravitons, the associated Berry phases generalize Thomas precession and provide, in principle, observable signatures of asymptotic symmetries.

Tuesday 6 February 2018, 16:00 at IPHT, Salle Claude Itzykson, Bât. 774 IPHT-HEP (Séminaire de physique des particules et de cosmologie) hep-ph
Marco Ruggieri ( School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Lanzhou University ) Gluon fields in high energy proton-proton collisions
Abstract: The initial stage of inelastic high energy nuclear collisions is known as the Glasma, namely a configuration of strong chromo-electric and chromo-magnetic fields which develop along the flight direction of the two colliding nuclei; the evolution of these fields eventually leads to the formation of the quark-gluon plasma. In this seminar I focus on the Glasma that can be produced in high energy proton-proton collisions. The main goals are the study of isotropization, of gauge invariant correlation functions that allow us to understand the building up of color domains and the string breaking of the Glasma starting from the color strings, and of the distribution of the topological charge density which might be relevant for the chiral magnetic effect.

Tuesday 6 February 2018, 17:15 at DPT-PHYS-ENS, room Jean Jaurès (29 rue d'Ulm) SEM-PHYS-ENS (Colloquium du Département de Physique de l'ENS) cond-mat.mes-hall
Jacqueline Bloch ( Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Marcoussis ) Fluids of light in semiconductor lattice
Abstract: When confining photons in semiconductor lattices, it is possible deeply modifying their physical properties. Photons can behave as finite or even infinite mass particles, photons can propagate along edge states without back scattering, photons can become superfluid, photons can behave as interacting particles. These are just a few examples of properties that can be imprinted into fluids of light in semiconductor lattices. Such manipulation of light present not only potential for applications in photonics, but great promise for fundamental studies. One can invent artificial media with very exotic physical properties at the single particle level or even more interestingly when many body interactions are considered. During the talk, I will illustrate the variety of physical systems we can emulate with fluids of light by presenting a few recent experiments. Perspectives in terms of quantum simulation will be discussed.

Thursday 8 February 2018, 11:00 at LPTHE, bibliothèque SEM-DARBOUX (Séminaire Darboux - physique théorique et mathématiques) math|math.MP
Emmanuel Letellier ( IMJ-PRG ) TBA

seminars from series at institute
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